Tips and Ideas Archives - Pirate Day

Tips and Ideas

April 15, 2021

Top 10 Tips For A Swashbuckling Pirate Day!

Ahoy there! We are so excited to have you and your band of buccaneers aboard for this year’s Pirate Day. Enjoy a day of dressing up and having lots of pirate fun, all for a very serious cause. Money raised through Pirate Day funds vital scientific research to improve outcomes for kids diagnosed with brain cancer. 

But are you struggling to find your sea legs? Marooned on an island without ideas? Well Shiver me timbers – The Kids’ Cancer Project has ten tips to make your Pirate Day one that every scallywag will enjoy!

1. Pin the Patch on Orlando Pirate Bear:

An old time classic given a swashbuckling twist. Print out the picture of Orlando Pirate Bear from our website. Choose the first shipmate, cover their eyes with a soft piece of fabric or bandana and pass them an eyepatch (with some tape on the back).

Gently turn them on the spot before asking them to place the eyepatch on the picture. Whoever gets closest to the correct spot is the winner!


2. Pirate Obstacle Course:

Whether it’s following a chalk line on the ground, running around cones or setting up an actual plank, an obstacle course is a great addition to the day.

Conjure thoughts of shark infested waters by placing the plank over a small paddling pool.

3. Pirate Arts and Crafts:

 Encourage your crew’s creativity with pirate-themed painting and drawing. Print out pictures of parrots on bright coloured paper to decorate with glitter and feathers or make a treasure chest using our template.


4. Build a Pirate Ship:

Save a large cardboard box and decorate with craft paint to create your own version of the Black Pearl. Add embellishments, like a fabric jolly roger flag to complete the look!

5. Look the part:

Whether it’s an eyepatch or a captain’s hat, the best part of Pirate Day is dressing up. Use our template to cut out easy eyepatches or buy your very own Pirate Day eyepatches from our shop.


6. Treasure Hunt:

Smuggle chocolate gold coins or treasure away and use chalk or tape to mark the hiding spot with a giant ‘X’. Create a map for your buccaneers to follow as a fun task to find the bounty.

7. Pirate Food:

There are so many delicious treats you can add to your Pirate Day. How about covering biscuits in edible glitter to make yummy gold coins? Or trying an ambitious pirate ship made out of watermelon and fruit? For something savoury, decorate a pizza with a vegetable treasure map, with a bright red capsicum ‘X marks the spot’.


8. Port and Starboard Game:

Teach your crew basic nautical terms with this lively activity. A ‘captain’ shouts commands to his crew who must follow orders or walk the plank. Take a look at our ready-made activity sheet here.

8. Stash your pieces of eight:

Keep your pirate fortune safely locked away in your very own DIY chest. Stash it full of treasure to donate to help researchers turn the tide in treating kids’ cancer. Download our template here.


10. Story time:

After a long day of sailing the seas, how about winding down with an adventurous tale? Peter PanTreasure Island? There are so many pirate themed books to enjoy. Or maybe a film would better suit your crew? Our favourites are Pirates of the Caribbean and Muppet Treasure Island.


Register here

April 2, 2021

A swashbuckling week of pirate fun

This Pirate Day, let’s make kids’ brain cancer walk the plank!

Batten down the hatches! In May, buccaneers from across Australia will be embracing their inner scallywags and dressing up as pirates for a great cause.

Every year, hundreds of crews across the nation set sail on pirate adventures to raise money and awareness for kids’ brain cancer. From schools and offices to gyms, The Kids’ Cancer Project welcomes everyone aboard to embrace their inner pirate and raise funds for vital scientific research to improve outcomes for kids with brain cancer.

Read more: Turning the tide on kids’ brain cancer.

But why drop the anchor on Pirate Day after just one day? Here at The Kids’ Cancer Project, we’ll be embarking on a full week of pirate adventures to raise as much treasure as possible to turn the tide on childhood brain cancer.

Pirate Day, approved for use - user generated

Monday: Make it Monday

Even fearsome pirates love to draw. Why not bring out your crew’s creativity with a pirate themed craft day?

Get everyone to paint their dream pirate ship complete with jolly roger flags, or jazz up pictures of parrots with glitter. But avast, if you’re out of ideas never fear! The Kids’ Cancer Project has plenty of resources to get you started, including nifty pirate bandanas and pirate eyepatches for kids and adults to cut out and enjoy. Find them here.

Tuesday: Treasure Hunt Tuesday

What do pirates love most? Pillaging treasure! Set up your own treasure hunt hiding gold coins or other treats. To make it even trickier, hide the booty in a sandpit and get your pirate gang to use spades, sieves and colanders to dig for loot.

Any real coins and pieces of eight can be stored safely in your very own treasure chest/donations box. We have a template to make your own here.

Wednesday: Water Wednesday

Arghhh! The feeling of the open sea. Bring the ocean to you with a fun walk the plank game. For the more intrepid (who don’t mind getting wet) you can set up a sturdy plank across a paddling pool. Or, use a tarp or piece of blue fabric on the ground.

For added danger, cut out cardboard shark fins. Will you make it across or end up as shark bait?

Pirate Day, approved for use - user generated

Thursday: Talk like a Pirate Thursday

Do you know your ‘doubloons’ from your ‘mizzens’? What’s a ‘landlubber’? Use Thursday to practice your ‘arrrghs’ and ‘ahoys’ and learn to speak like a pirate.

Once you’ve mastered the lingo, have a go at our port and starboard game to test your knowledge of nautical terms. Find it here.

Friday: Pirate Day Friday

End your week of pirate fun with a bang! Invite friends and family to a big Pirate Day Friday and encourage them to wear a captain’s hat and bring gold coins.

How about hosting a pirate themed lunch or BBQ? Or, make some delicious nautical themed sweet treats. Use icing to decorate biscuits with pirate faces or make chocolate cannon ball cake pops.

Use our editable posters to spread the word about your Pirate Day Friday. Find them here.


Register here

March 11, 2021

Announcement: Set sail on Pirate Day 2021

Let’s turn the tide on brain cancer this Pirate Day!

This May thousands of buccaneers across Australia will be hoisting the mainsail for The Kids’ Cancer Project’s Pirate Day 2021. Pirate Day is a swashbuckling day of dressing up like a pirate to raise money for children’s brain cancer research.

With more kids in Australia dying of brain cancer than any other disease, now is it the time to make a difference. This Pirate Day, we want Australians to help us turn the tide on childhood brain cancer!

Pirate Day has raised more than $360,000 for brain cancer research since 2015. These funds are already helping researchers make waves in the lab.

Read more: Behind the Science Professor Joshua McCaroll

This year, there are even more scientists ready to get on board to work towards finding cures. By donning an eyepatch and brushing up on your yo-ho-hos, you can have fun raising money to help researchers. And you’ll be improving outcomes for kids with cancer.

At The Kids’ Cancer Project, we’ll be setting sail on our Pirate Day on Friday 14 May. But pirate crews around Australia can choose any day in May, coinciding with May being Brain Cancer Awareness Month.

Pirate Day 2021 Scientists

Money raised this year will be directed to Dr Raelene Endersby, Co-Head, Brain Tumour Research at Telethon Kids Institute. The team have recently received a grant from The Kids’ Cancer Project for a scientific collaboration. This will include a number of groups around Australia and the United States.

“In a project funded by The Kids’ Cancer Project we are investigating an exciting new immunotherapy treatment and we are optimising the best way to deliver it to children diagnosed with brain cancer to get the greatest effect,” says Dr Endersby.

The study looks into immunotherapy’s ability to teach the body’s immune system to recognise and destroy brain cancer cells. Their research has the potential to lead to new clinical trials in the near future.

“This funding, and any additional research funding we can obtain, means that we can get our research achieved faster, and in turn we can advance these new treatments to the clinic more rapidly to help children with brain cancer,” Dr Endersby says.

Read more: Turning the tide on kids’ brain cancer

Improving outcomes

Col Reynolds OAM, founder of The Kids’ Cancer Project is delighted by the Pirate Day initiative.

“It’s great to have a bit of fun despite the serious nature of kids’ cancer,” he said. “Many people aren’t aware that the causes of childhood cancer are unknown, that there is no prevention and that research is the only way to improve treatments and survival.”

Apart from working on exciting new research, how will Dr Endersby and her research crew be getting involved in Pirate Day?

“Shiver me timbers, me and my fellow scallywags will definitely be increasing awareness by getting our pirate gear on, but at the same time we’ll get all hands-on deck in the lab,” she says.

To register a Pirate Day event or make a donation, please register here.

Find out more about The Kids’ Cancer Project here.


Register

The facts:

  • Brain tumours are the most common form of solid tumours among children.
  • Brain cancer kills more children in Australia than any other disease. 
  • As with other tumours in kids and adults, surgery is the primary treatment, usually followed by radiation treatment and/or chemotherapy.
  • Because a child’s brain is still developing, these treatments can result in more substantial and permanent side effects than they would for an adult.
February 22, 2021

Turning the tide on kids’ brain cancer

Dr Raelene Endersby, Co-Head, Brain Tumour Research at Telethon Kids Institute is investigating an exciting new immunotherapy for children with brain cancer that has potential to lead to new clinical trials in the near future.

The laboratory at the West Australian centre that Raelene runs in partnership with Dr Nick Gottardo recently received a grant from The Kids’ Cancer Project for an exciting scientific collaboration with a number of groups around Australia and the United States.


Behind the science | Kids’ cancer research dynamic duo

The study looks into immunotherapy, as opposed to chemotherapy or radiotherapy, to teach the body’s immune system to recognise and destroy brain cancer cells.

“There are still many children diagnosed with incurable brain cancer where we have no treatments to offer,” says Dr Endersby.

“Immunotherapy is a relatively new treatment that has worked very well in some adult cancers, but these benefits have not yet been realised for kids with brain cancer.”

Dr Raelene Endersby and Dr Nick Gottardo

“In a project funded by The Kids’ Cancer Project we are investigating an exciting new immunotherapy treatment and we are optimising the best way to deliver it to children diagnosed with brain cancer to get the greatest effect,” says Dr Endersby.

With brain cancer ranking as the number one killer of young Australians by disease, Dr Endersby says funding for this work is critical because children diagnosed urgently need new treatments.

“This funding, and any additional research funding we can obtain, means that we can get our research achieved faster, and in turn we can advance these new treatments to the clinic more rapidly to help children with brain cancer,” she says.

Dr Endersby and team members in the lab

Pirates to help kids with brain cancer

Help is on the way. Money raised through The Kids’ Cancer Project Pirate Day in 2021 will be directed specifically to Dr Endersby’s scientific investigation.

Pirate Day is a national day of swashbuckling for the serious cause of scientific research to find kinder, more effective cures for childhood brain cancer.


Register now | Pirate Day

This year, the annual fundraiser will be held on Friday 14 May. But the young and young at heart are encouraged to dress up any day throughout Brain Cancer Awareness Month in May, to raise awareness and funds.

With a twinkle in her eye, Dr Endersby shares how she and her team will be getting involved.

“Shiver me timbers, me and my fellow scallywags will definitely be increasing awareness by getting our pirate gear on, but at the same time we’ll get all hands on deck in the lab to keep our research going,” she says.

On a more serious note, Dr Endersby explains why Pirate Day is so important to her and the team at Telethon Kids Institute.

“Pirate Day is an important way we can raise awareness about childhood brain cancer,” she shares.

“Many people are fortunate to not be personally affected by this disease, but for the families who are – it is devastating. We are committed to helping these children and their families by finding new treatments.”

“And by increasing the awareness of what these kids go through, Pirate Day will hopefully lead to more support for those families but also for our research.”

July 15, 2020

Set Sail for Pirate Day 2020

Pirate Day is a national fundraising day encouraging kids and the young at heart to dress like pirates to raise money for childhood brain cancer research through The Kids’ Cancer Project and The Pirate Ship Foundation.

Participants all around the country are encouraged to host their filibuster fundraiser any time throughout the year. The collaborating charities usually push the boat out for Pirate Day in May however, due to the coronavirus pandemic this year, organisers chose to move the official day for 2020 to Thursday 24 September, which is also World Cancer Research Day.

Fundraisers can also double their impact this September and October as every dollar raised will be matched as part of The Kids’ Cancer Project Double Impact Appeal. That’s twice the science and double the hope for kids with brain cancer.

Now in its sixth year, Pirate Day has become a national favourite but the concept was conceived in tragic circumstances when in 2014 Nathan Colgan of Perth, learned his son, Conor (then five-years-old), had an aggressive brain tumour

“The more I read up on the disease, the more heartbroken I became,” the distraught dad shared.

“I discovered that for every two children diagnosed with a brain tumour, one will sadly lose their life. And the ones that do survive often have severe, lasting side effects. The only way to change this is to put more funding into scientific research,” said Nathan.

By donning an eye patch and making a donation, every Australian can make a serious difference.

Last year more than 300 schools and early learning centres, along with workplaces and rum bars got behind the cause.

Since Pirate Day started in 2015, more than $300,000 has been raised for scientific studies to find kinder, more effective treatments for the disease that tragically claims the lives of more children in Australia than any other.

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Associate Professor Joshua McCarroll prepares to set sail for Pirate Day 2020.

Where the money raised goes

In 2020, funds will be directed specifically to a study lead by Associate Professor Joshua McCarroll, Team Leader of the Gene Therapeutics and Drug Delivery group at Children’s Cancer Institute and the Australian Centre for NanoMedicine, UNSW.

Col Reynolds OAM, founder of The Kids’ Cancer Project is delighted with the initiative.

“It’s great to have a bit of fun to fundraise despite the serious nature of kids’ cancer. Many people aren’t aware that the causes of childhood cancer are unknown, that there is no prevention and that research is the only way to improve treatments and survival,” he said. 

The Kids’ Cancer Project is an independent national charity supporting childhood cancer research. Over the past 15 years, the charity has committed more than $50 million in funding to childhood cancer research. Funding that’s only been possible through community fundraising events.

“It is only through research that my son Conor, who is now ten, has defied the odds and is still with us today,” said Nathan. “I wish I could say he has been cured of his illness but sadly his fight against cancer is not yet over and neither is mine.”

“Our journey continues, but with the support of every Australian who takes part in Pirate Day, we have the courage to keep going,” Nathan said.

July 9, 2020

Behind the Science: Associate Professor Josh McCarroll

The brain’s natural defence mechanisms make treatment of brain tumours extremely difficult. One researcher with a very personal childhood cancer connection is hoping to change that.

The brain’s natural defence mechanisms make treatment of brain tumours extremely difficult. One researcher with a very personal childhood cancer connection is hoping to change that.

The human body has evolved so that the brain is protected at all costs. Between the brain and other systems, including the blood system, there is a highly protective barrier that prevents toxic substances entering the brain.

Tragically, for children suffering brain cancers such as medulloblastoma, this means it is also extremely difficult to treat brain tumours with traditional drugs that have proved effective in other parts of the body.

Most chemotherapy drugs have difficulty in penetrating the blood-brain barrier. So, for children suffering medulloblastoma, their body must be loaded up with massive amounts of such drugs in order for them to have an effect on the brain tumour.

“If you do want to get the drug crossing to the brain tumour, you have to use high concentrations for it to have an effect, but the consequence of that is long-term side effects for these kids,” says Associate Professor Joshua McCarroll, Team Leader of the Gene Therapeutics and Drug Delivery group at Children’s Cancer Institute and the Australian Centre for NanoMedicine, UNSW. Joshua is also a survivor of childhood cancer.

“You’ve got some kids at the age of five to ten who may survive the cancer because the treatments are good, but the consequences of those treatments can be terrible,” he says. “The kids can be left with learning difficulties and hearing difficulties, all sorts of problems that seriously affect their quality of life. That’s a really big challenge we’re trying to face.”

Breaching the barrier

With the help of funding from The Kids’ Cancer Project, Joshua is conducting research in the field of nanotechnology to develop a ‘Trojan horse’ that is capable of carrying targeted drugs across the blood-brain barrier.


Read more: Application of gene-silencing nanodrugs to inhibit medulloblastoma growth


“We can design these nanoparticles in such a way to optimise them getting into the brain, and even deliver drugs that can selectively penetrate the tumour cells to deliver more targeted drugs directly to the tumour,” he says.

“The nanoparticles can be used to package a number of drugs, and one particular drug we’re testing is a relatively new class. One of the benefits of this type of drug is that it has high selectivity for its target gene.”

In other words, the nanoparticle can ensure the drug’s entry into the brain, then the drug will actively hunt down the tumour, or the genes that play a role in the tumour’s aggressiveness, which might slow down or stop the tumour’s growth.

A clinical trial, Joshua says, could be just five to ten years away.

The funding from The Kids’ Cancer Project, Joshua explains, is very special for a number of reasons. First, it makes the research possible. Second, the value of the funding is doubled by the Federal Government’s Priority-driven Collaborative Cancer Research Scheme, which matched the funding from The Kids’ Cancer Project dollar for dollar. And finally, it helps Joshua to continue to improve the future for children who have been blindsided by cancer, just as he was.

The scientist’s cancer journey

Joshua was just 12 when he was diagnosed with Hodgkin lymphoma, a blood cancer.

“I usually tell people that the day you’re diagnosed with cancer is the day that particular person, the person they were before the diagnosis, dies,” he says. “But it’s not necessarily a bad thing. A new person is born as they go through the treatment. So from the age of 12, I became a different person. Cancer became a part of my life and today I’m trying to give back to others who share that with me.”

“I’m very passionate about the toxic side effects and the long-term toxicity from the treatments. And I understand this topic, because I had to suffer some of them as well. With brain cancers, which are some of the nastiest cancers, long-term toxicity is a really big problem. So I think any sort of treatment we can develop that can minimise that toxicity has to be a very good thing.”

On the lighter side, being a practitioner and supporter of childhood cancer research also has its fun moments, such as Pirate Day, for which Joshua has agreed to dress as a pirate to help raise funds.

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Associate Professor Joshua McCarroll prepares to set sail for Pirate Day 2020.

“I’m thinking I will definitely have to wear a pirate’s hat,” he smiles, before agreeing that he might also be convinced to consider an eyepatch, a sword and a wooden leg.

Pirate Day is a national fundraising day encouraging kids and the young at heart to dress like pirates to raise money for childhood brain cancer research through The Kids’ Cancer Project and The Pirate Ship Foundation. 

Participants all around the country are encouraged to host their filibuster fundraiser any time throughout the year. The collaborating charities usually push the boat out for Pirate Day in May however, due to the coronovirus pandemic this year, organisers chose to move the official day for 2020 to Thursday 24 September, which is also World Cancer Research Day.

May 5, 2020

Pirate Day Trivia

Arrr' did ye know? We've dug up 20 questions, all about pirates to test your knowledge before you take to the high seas. Will you win the booty or have to walk the plank?

  1. What is the name of the captain of the fictional ship the Black Pearl?

  2. The pirates skull & crossbones flag is commonly known by which strangely cheerful name? 

  3. Which fictional pirate has a bo’sun name Mr Smee? 

  4. What were Spanish doubloons? 

  5. According to the pirate song, how many men are there on a dead man’s chest? 

  6. Beginning with C what is the type of sword most commonly associated with pirates? 

  7. What name is given to the punishment where a sailor is tied to a line that is looped beneath a ship, thrown overboard, and dragged under the ship?

  8. What is Davy Jones Locker? 

  9. What is the large island in the Caribbean, beginning with “H” frequently mentioned in pirate stories that is the home to the modern day countries of Haiti & the Dominican Republic? 

  10. Which American city has a Major League baseball team called the Pirates?

  11. Which famous religious figure is said to have been captured by pirates at the age of 16 and taken to Ireland ?

  12. In the 2012 animated movie The Pirates (Band of Misfits) the Pirate Captain’s “parrot” is actually what type of bird?

  13. What well-known brand of rum is named after a pirate? 

  14. Who is the pirate villain of Treasure Island?

  15. With a real name of Edward Teach and captaining the Queen Anne’s Revenge how is the most infamous of all the non-fictional pirates better known?

  16. The pirates’ favoured drink, made from rum, water, lemon juice & sugar was known as what? A name still used today for alcohol generally.  

  17. Captain Hook in Peter Pan lived in mortal fear of what type of animal? 

  18. Which rock star (who appears in one of the movies as his father) did Johnny Depp base his Jack Sparrow character on? 

  19. Which musical duo composed the light operetta The Pirates of Penzance?

  20. Which month is Brain Cancer Awareness Month?

ANSWERS:
1. Jack Sparrow, 2. Jolly Roger, 3. Captain Hook, 4. (Gold) Coins, 5. 15, 6. Cutlass, 7. Keelhauling, 8. The bottom of the sea, 9. Hispaniola, 10. Pittsburgh, 11. St Patrick, 12. Dodo, 13. Captain Morgan, 14. Long John Silver, 15. Blackbeard, 16. Grog, 17. Crocodile, 18. Keith Richards, 19. Gilbert & Sullivan, 20. May

March 31, 2020

A note from the Pirate Day team regarding COVID-19

Since 2015, buccaneers of all ages have raised more than $300,000 to find better treatments and ultimately a cure for childhood brain cancer.

While there is uncertainty about future restrictions due to COVID-19, we’re encouraging everyone to register for Pirate Day on Friday 22 May (or any day you like). Whether you get your gang together either in small groups or virtually on social media #pirateday2020. We have tips to help you have a great day.

Pirate Day is a vital activity to raise funds for our most vulnerable kids. Let’s not give up now!

Please register your 2020 Pirate Day today and stand with us in solidarity for all children with brain cancer.

March 24, 2020

Seven steps to hosting a virtual Pirate Day

Arrr’ you shipshape and ready for your virtual fundraiser? Follow these steps and you can enjoy Pirate Day without leaving the comfort of your own cabin while raising much-needed funds for kids’ with brain cancer. Schools and Early Learning Centres can share these tips with students, parents and caregivers for a fundraiser the whole family and community can be part of.

1. X marks the spot

We are setting sail on Friday 22 May, but you can choose any date that works best for you. Mark it on your calendar and be sure to register here .

2. Stay connected

Join our online community via the Pirate Day Facebook Event. Here you’ll be able to stay up-to-date with any Pirate Day developments, share ideas and photos, and easily invite your friends to take part too!

3. Involve your crew (virtually!)

Start fundraising by creating an Everydayhero page and then share it with family and friends using social media and email. Ask for treasure to support the cause and who knows, maybe they’ll join you by dressing up on Pirate Day too!

4. Yo-ho-ho it’s time to decorate

Download and print out our Jolly Roger decorations to create the pirate vibe at your place. You’ll find eye patches and hats too so  you can ditch landlubber looks for your buccaneer best.

5. Prepare to have a fun-filled day

We’ve cooked up activities suitable for the young and young at heart. You can also bake pirate inspired treats – chocolate cannon balls anyone? Organise a treasure hunt around the house, or relax with some colouring in or pirate ship origami.

6. Weigh anchor – it’s Pirate Day!

Show us how you’re making kids’ brain cancer walk the plank by sharing photos and videos on social media with #pirateday2020.

7. Bank your booty!

If you received any cash donations, add them to your Everydayhero page or bank online.

March 24, 2020

Pirate activities for kids

Hoist the mainsail and have a rollicking good time! Set a course for adventure this Pirate Day with activities to bring out the young buccaneer or old salt in everyone. We developed these resources with teachers in mind https://www.pirateday.com.au/teachers-aids/, but anyone can follow along to really put the fun into this fundraiser.

1. Port and starboard

This is Simon Says with a salty twist. A ‘captain’ shouts commands to his crew who must follow orders. The commands are related to life at sea, creating a great opportunity to learn some nautical lingo. Download the captain’s orders here. Suitable for all ages.

2. Ocean sensory tray

If you don’t mind a bit of mess and have good hygiene practices in place, little ones will have a lot of fun sticking their hands into a squishy, squelchy ocean sensory tray. Hide “treasure” in jelly or wet sand and ask them what they can feel and find. A variation on the theme of this activity is to play ocean sounds through speakers and talk about what can be heard. Download full activity instructions here.  Suitable for ages 3 – 7.

3. Colour in Orlando

Colouring in is a great activity for the young ones and not so young ones too! Mindfully or mindlessly using crayons, markers and pencils or paint, colour in our very own Pirate Bear, Orlando. Download the printable here. Suitable for all ages.

4. Pirate jokes

Childhood brain cancer is no laughing matter, but then again, the do say laughter is the best medicine. We’ve compiled 14 of our favourite jokes to celebrate Pirate Day here. Suitable all ages.

5. Origami

Origami is a great activity to develop hand-eye coordination, spatial skills and concentration. Find some coloured paper or recycle the pages of magazines and create your very own pirate ship. Download full activity instructions here. Suitable for ages 6 – 12.

6. Films to inspire

When you’ve had enough pirate play, break out your favourite snacks, find a comfy spot to relax and enjoy these classic movies with the whole family.

  • The Pirates of Penzance (1983) | G | 1h 52 mins
  • Walt Disney’s Peter Pan (1953) | G | 1h 17 mins
  • Muppet Treasure Island (1996) | G | 1h 39 mins
  • The Pirates! In an Adventure with Scientists (2012) | G | 1h 28 mins
  • The Pirates Who Don’t Do Anything: A VeggieTales Movie (2008) | G | 1h 25 mins
  • Jake and the Never Land Pirates (Animated TV series 2011 – 2016)
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